The Key to Organic Food Labels

June 4, 2010 by  
Filed under Food

Did you know that last year the Americans spent $25 billion for organic products and according to the rhythm in which organic food sales goes, this year the figure is expected to get to $30 billion? This is indeed extraordinary! But this impressive figure is due not only to the booming of the organic food sale, but also to its price.
Everybody knows organic food cost more than the nonorganic one. But when it comes to preserving their health through a healthy diet, it seems like people have no second thoughts about paying more for their food. The only thing they have in mind is the benefits of the quality nutrition these products offer. But is that really so? I wonder…
When buying organic food, there some things you should know first. The first and most important thing you have to do before buying it is to check for the label that certifies the organic quality of the product you have chosen. Thus, look for the Certified Organic Seal.
This seal guarantees you that the food you have chosen meets the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) standards for organic food and that the producer of that particular food has successfully passed the examination of the USDA-accredited inspector. Thus you can be sure that your organic food was in no way subject to herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers genetically-modified seeds or irradiation treatment.
Another thing you should keep in mind is that there are several categories organic food falls in. Thus, there are the “100% Organic” food, the simply “Organic” food (only 95 – 99% is organic) and the “Made with Organic Ingredients” foods (in which only 74 to 94% is organic). Make sure you understand precisely what the label on your food says. None of the labels listed above speaks about the nutritional content of the food.
Many people think that consuming organic food provides them with more and higher nutrients. However, the studies made on the matter have given different results, some of them supporting this theory and others, on the contrary, proving it wrong. For better and more precise results larger and more elaborate studies are needed.
Another thing the label speaks nothing about is the place the product is grown. Although people think the organic product grows in the same locale it is sold, this is rarely the case. From this point of view, organic and traditionally-grown foods differ only in the manner they are grown, handled and processed.
Buying organic food not only benefits ourselves but the environment as well. Their growing, handling and processing methods preserve the natural resources of the environment. Bottom line, if you are willing to choose organic food over the traditionally-grown one and pay extra for it, make sure you buy organic and spend your money exactly on what you are buying.

Did you know that last year the Americans spent $25 billion for organic products and according to the rhythm in which organic food sales goes, this year the figure is expected to get to $30 billion? This is indeed extraordinary! But this impressive figure is due not only to the booming of the organic food sale, but also to its price.
Everybody knows organic food cost more than the nonorganic one. But when it comes to preserving their health through a healthy diet, it seems like people have no second thoughts about paying more for their food. The only thing they have in mind is the benefits of the quality nutrition these products offer. But is that really so? I wonder…
When buying organic food, there some things you should know first. The first and most important thing you have to do before buying it is to check for the label that certifies the organic quality of the product you have chosen. Thus, look for the Certified Organic Seal.
This seal guarantees you that the food you have chosen meets the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) standards for organic food and that the producer of that particular food has successfully passed the examination of the USDA-accredited inspector. Thus you can be sure that your organic food was in no way subject to herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers genetically-modified seeds or irradiation treatment.
Another thing you should keep in mind is that there are several categories organic food falls in. Thus, there are the “100% Organic” food, the simply “Organic” food (only 95 – 99% is organic) and the “Made with Organic Ingredients” foods (in which only 74 to 94% is organic). Make sure you understand precisely what the label on your food says. None of the labels listed above speaks about the nutritional content of the food.
Many people think that consuming organic food provides them with more and higher nutrients. However, the studies made on the matter have given different results, some of them supporting this theory and others, on the contrary, proving it wrong. For better and more precise results larger and more elaborate studies are needed.
Another thing the label speaks nothing about is the place the product is grown. Although people think the organic product grows in the same locale it is sold, this is rarely the case. From this point of view, organic and traditionally-grown foods differ only in the manner they are grown, handled and processed.
Buying organic food not only benefits ourselves but the environment as well. Their growing, handling and processing methods preserve the natural resources of the environment. Bottom line, if you are willing to choose organic food over the traditionally-grown one and pay extra for it, make sure you buy organic and spend your money exactly on what you are buying.

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